About

We are a nonprofit bookstore, cafe, and event space in downtown NYC. All proceeds from every show you attend and everything you buy, down to a record and a PBR, go directly to our mission of fighting AIDS and homelessness. 126 Crosby Street, NYC

Email us or ask us anything.

Join Our Newsletter

Which newsletters are you interested in? Bookstore Café Newsletter (Twice a month)
Thrift Shop Newsletter (Twice a month)
AIDS Issues Update Blog (Once a week on Friday Mornings)

Posts tagged books
The Jewish Book Council has created this neat literary map of NYC that highlights some of the Jewish writers who’ve written about the city. The map includes Dara Horn, Philip Roth, J. D. Salinger, and many more. (via A Jewish Literary Map of NYC | Electric Literature)

The Jewish Book Council has created this neat literary map of NYC that highlights some of the Jewish writers who’ve written about the city. The map includes Dara Horn, Philip Roth, J. D. Salinger, and many more. (via A Jewish Literary Map of NYC | Electric Literature)

"I don’t want to always write stories about the same kind of disaffected, angsty youngish dude. Everyone assumes he’s a proxy for the author, which is frustrating because he usually isn’t. But it can also be frustrating because sometimes he is, and there are better places to hide than in your own skin. Anyway, I realized that just because a story has someone demographically like me in it, that character shouldn’t automatically get protagonist status. There are, of course, still angsty youngish dudes in this book, but they had to earn their place at the table in a way they didn’t before." —Justin Taylor via Justin Taylor interview: ‘I don’t always want to write about the same disaffected, angsty dude’
Justin is here with Jess Row NEXT week, for Where Are Jess Row and Justin Taylor? on August 26; don’t miss it or his new book, Flings, out today.

"I don’t want to always write stories about the same kind of disaffected, angsty youngish dude. Everyone assumes he’s a proxy for the author, which is frustrating because he usually isn’t. But it can also be frustrating because sometimes he is, and there are better places to hide than in your own skin. Anyway, I realized that just because a story has someone demographically like me in it, that character shouldn’t automatically get protagonist status. There are, of course, still angsty youngish dudes in this book, but they had to earn their place at the table in a way they didn’t before."
—Justin Taylor via Justin Taylor interview: ‘I don’t always want to write about the same disaffected, angsty dude’

Justin is here with Jess Row NEXT week, for Where Are Jess Row and Justin Taylor? on August 26; don’t miss it or his new book, Flings, out today.

One more from this.

One more from this.

New podcast episode! Check it out to hear a story from Nick Greene about the one wedding speech he’s given, an excerpt from Stacey D’Erasmo’s Wonderland, and an essay by Melissa Febos about hickeys. Lots of fun stuff in this episode; give it a listen on Soundcloud (above) or iTunes!

There’s a new podcast episode up today! You can listen to clips from our events celebrating Dottie’s Charms, The Misshapes, and DISH’s one year anniversary. Check it out on SoundCloud and iTunes now!

820 notes
amandaonwriting:

Books are better

It’s time to be true to ourselves.

amandaonwriting:

Books are better

It’s time to be true to ourselves.

(via everybodyreadingbooks)

HWBC Weekly Roundup

- James Parker and Anna Holmes on book promotion
- PEN Poetry Series posted “The Day” by Anthony McCann
- Before they were stars…
- St. Vincent covering Big Black’s “Kerosene”
- Jane Austen really cared about her reviews
- And because I’m childish I found this way too funny: Book Titles in Jorts
[Image via]
All customers can save 30% on our art and design books today through Sunday during ARTOPIA!

All customers can save 30% on our art and design books today through Sunday during ARTOPIA!

If a bookshelf and a comfy chair met in a bar, hit it off, and had a baby, the result would be this chair, from furniture company Nobody & Co. It’s called the Bibliochaise, and for lazy readers (aren’t we all?), it’s the library of the future. The Bibliochaise — which really looks more like a throne — holds five meters of books, which works out to about 300 of your favorite classics. (via The Bibliochaise Bookshelf Chair Is a Miniature Library for Your Apartment | Swimmingly)

If a bookshelf and a comfy chair met in a bar, hit it off, and had a baby, the result would be this chair, from furniture company Nobody & Co. It’s called the Bibliochaise, and for lazy readers (aren’t we all?), it’s the library of the future. The Bibliochaise — which really looks more like a throne — holds five meters of books, which works out to about 300 of your favorite classics. (via The Bibliochaise Bookshelf Chair Is a Miniature Library for Your Apartment | Swimmingly)

National Poetry Month in a podcast? Yeah, that’s right. Nine poets we hosted in April read in this episode of On Stage at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe. You can enjoy it on Soundcloud (you can also click above) or iTunes!

Stuff We like

More Stuff We Like »