About

We are a nonprofit bookstore, cafe, and event space in downtown NYC. All proceeds from every show you attend and everything you buy, down to a record and a PBR, go directly to our mission of fighting AIDS and homelessness. 126 Crosby Street, NYC

Email us or ask us anything.

Join Our Newsletter

Which newsletters are you interested in? Bookstore Café Newsletter (Twice a month)
Thrift Shop Newsletter (Twice a month)
AIDS Issues Update Blog (Once a week on Friday Mornings)

Posts tagged comics
4,670 notes

nickdouglas:

colleenclarkart:

image

Click “Read More” to see the rest of the comic!

Read More

I love those two top panels—they tell a story in a smart, economical way that could not be specifically reproduced in another medium. They are the opening to a story with important content, but they’re also an elegant use of form that makes my head swoon.

This is one kick-ass comic. Click through and read the whole thing.

In On Stage at Housing Works episode 16, Art Spiegelman talks about the San Francisco comics hierarchy and his time in communes, Timothy Donnelly reads from Roald Dahl’s Little Red Riding Hood" in celebration of banned books, Juan Gabriel Vasquez sits down in conversation with fellow author Richard Price, and Judy Batalion reads from an essay about Cape Town in a piece from issue 1 of travel journal [wherever]. 

You can listen to our biweekly podcast on Soundcloud or subscribe on Tunes or via RSS!

Art Spiegelman Discusses the Art of Comics

pantheonbooks:

image 

Check out this fantastic interview with Art Spiegelman in NEA Arts Magazine (National Endowment for the Arts).

Check out Art himself in our bookstore on Tuesday, September 24 at Art Spiegelman Launches CO-MIX: A Retrospective of Comics, Graphics and Scraps!

Gabrielle Bell, 7.18.13 | Lucky

Gabrielle Bell, 7.18.13 | Lucky

On reading Lolita and first kisses with boys with “Chiclet-perfect teeth.” (via Rookie » Two Kinds of Memory)

On reading Lolita and first kisses with boys with “Chiclet-perfect teeth.” (via Rookie » Two Kinds of Memory)

It’s a big week at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe!

  • Tonight, join us for An Evening of Big Feminist BUTs with Gabrielle Bell, Josh Neufeld, Heidi MacDonald and More to celebrate the Kickstarter-funded The Big Feminist BUT: Comics About Women, Men and the IFs ANDs & BUTs of Feminism.
  • Tomorrow we welcome The Moth StorySLAM for a show on “Summer Love.” You’ll want to line up by 6pm for 7pm doors; it always sells out! $8 at the door.
  • Wednesday DISH is back with a great line up: Tim Federle reads from his hilarious literary cocktail book, Tequila MockingbirdHolly Howard discusses the ins and out of the food-based business world; Jennifer Perillo in conversation with Sarah DeHeer of the Food Network, about her debut cookbook Jennie’s Homemade with Love; and Fany Gerson, AKA “La Newyorkina”, chats about life as one of NYC’s favorite street food vendors and shares tips from My Sweet Mexico and Paletas. There will be drinks and snacks!
  • And Thursday we are so excited to celebrate the reissue of Chocolates for Breakfast with Emma Straub (will she give birth in the bookstore? come find out!), the author’s son Kevin Kanarek, and short readings from Megan Abbott, Elisa Albert, Lauren Cerand, Alexander Chee, Stephanie LaCava, and Rachel Syme.
  • Friday it’s Happy Day Happy Hour!
  • And Saturday Merrill’s International Crime Book Group will meet to discuss Melville Crime’s A Very Profitable War at 11:30am.
“The beginning of my depression had been nothing but feelings, so the emotional deadening that followed was a welcome relief.  I had always wanted to not give a fuck about anything. I viewed feelings as a weakness — annoying obstacles on my quest for total power over myself. And I finally didn’t have to feel them anymore.

But my experiences slowly flattened and blended together until it became obvious that there’s a huge difference between not giving a fuck and not being able to give a fuck. Cognitively, you might know that different things are happening to you, but they don’t feel very different.”
Allie Brosh is back, and her post “Depression Part Two” is painful, and weird, and funny, and perfect. via Hyperbole and a Half: Depression Part Two)

The beginning of my depression had been nothing but feelings, so the emotional deadening that followed was a welcome relief.  I had always wanted to not give a fuck about anything. I viewed feelings as a weakness — annoying obstacles on my quest for total power over myself. And I finally didn’t have to feel them anymore.

But my experiences slowly flattened and blended together until it became obvious that there’s a huge difference between not giving a fuck and not being able to give a fuck. Cognitively, you might know that different things are happening to you, but they don’t feel very different.”

Allie Brosh is back, and her post “Depression Part Two” is painful, and weird, and funny, and perfect. via Hyperbole and a Half: Depression Part Two)

lucyknisley:

comicsworkbook:

Behold THE INFINITE CORPSE, a jam comic started in secret over a year ago by Aaron Renier, Nate Beaty and the other cartoonists of Chicago’s comics collective Trubble Club. Based on a combination of Raw’s Narrative Corpse project and Scott McCloud’s idea of the “infinite canvas,” it’s a kind of exquisite corpse comic focused around the skeleton Corpsey. There are already 200+ cartoonists who’ve participated (Art Spiegelman, Alison Bechdel, Pen Ward, Carol Tyler, Ivan Brunetti, Lilli Carré etc etc etc) and now it is open to everyone. So go, read! Contribute! Be a part of this ground-breaking new project!

-Jessica Campbell

I’m in this! I was a founding member of Trubble Club, and it’s awesome to see all it has wrought.

Wowowow this looks so good, excited to read more!

The Cartoonist in Comics: Using Autobiography in Graphic Novels (by TrillianMedia)

Missed Tuesday’s event on semi-autobiographical comics? Trillian Media made this super-impressive recording of the discussion.

The discussion between comics artists on the panel was often freeform and interactive during the event, and they chatted about the increasing role of images online, the freedom the internet offers in terms of self-publication, and the impact that it has had on autobiographical comic production. Haspiel commented on the ways that social media has become a form of autobiographical expression, leading him further down the road of embracing metaphor rather than strict biography in his work. (via On the Scene: ‘The Cartoonist in Comics’ at Housing Works with Haspiel, Fingerman, Gulledge, Young)
Heidi Means-Shannon’s kind and thorough write-up of Tuesday’s event.

The discussion between comics artists on the panel was often freeform and interactive during the event, and they chatted about the increasing role of images online, the freedom the internet offers in terms of self-publication, and the impact that it has had on autobiographical comic production. Haspiel commented on the ways that social media has become a form of autobiographical expression, leading him further down the road of embracing metaphor rather than strict biography in his work. (via On the Scene: ‘The Cartoonist in Comics’ at Housing Works with Haspiel, Fingerman, Gulledge, Young)

Heidi Means-Shannon’s kind and thorough write-up of Tuesday’s event.

Stuff We like

More Stuff We Like »