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Posts tagged flavorpill

The Fascinating Self-Portraits of 20 Famous Authors, over at Flavorwire. Above: Borges after he’d gone blind, Flannery O’Connor, Cormac McCarthy (the text says, I think, “Them old dreams are only in your head,” because sure).

flavorpill:

Exclusive: Thanksgiving Bingo for Your Dinner Table

As no strangers to bingo ourselves (we did all those debate bingos), we wholly support Flavorwire’s Thanksgiving bingo. And if you’re family is similar to mine, I would also recommend turning it into a drinking game. 
-Aaron

flavorpill:

Exclusive: Thanksgiving Bingo for Your Dinner Table

As no strangers to bingo ourselves (we did all those debate bingos), we wholly support Flavorwire’s Thanksgiving bingo. And if you’re family is similar to mine, I would also recommend turning it into a drinking game. 

-Aaron

"Mr. Melville is evidently trying to ascertain how far the public will consent to be imposed upon. He is gauging, at once, our gullibilty and our patience. Having written one or two passable extravagancies, he has considered himself privileged to produce as many more as he pleases, increasingly exaggerated and increasingly dull."— New York United States Magazine and Democratic Review, 1852 (via Flavorwire » 15 Scathing Early Reviews of Classic Novels)
These folks would beg to differ.

"Mr. Melville is evidently trying to ascertain how far the public will consent to be imposed upon. He is gauging, at once, our gullibilty and our patience. Having written one or two passable extravagancies, he has considered himself privileged to produce as many more as he pleases, increasingly exaggerated and increasingly dull."— New York United States Magazine and Democratic Review, 1852 (via Flavorwire » 15 Scathing Early Reviews of Classic Novels)

These folks would beg to differ.

"But I don’t read books ever on any devices. I understand why people in publishing do, because the volume is too great, and I understand why reviewers do, people who are required to read six or seven books a week, and I understand if you’re taking a flight to Zimbabwe and you’re going to be in the air for sixteen hours and you want to bring four books. But if that’s not the case, isn’t it always more pleasurable to just carry around a book? So I hope that bookstores still exist, and that books as objects still exist, in the future. Other than that, I think we’re good."

Flavorwire » The Future of American Fiction: An Interview with Emma Straub

Furthermore, Emma’s rejected sexy-Nancy-Drew-murdered-gay-poet novel sounds amazing.

"I do experience some version of the tension or gap between the virtual and the actual whenever I write: there is always a difference between what I intended to make and what I’ve made. The materials always resist. But this doesn’t have to be described in terms of doom. It can also be described as discovery, that you discover the form and content of the work in the act of writing."
— Ben Lerner (Leaving the Atocha Station, a book you NEED to read) via Flavorwire » The Future of American Fiction: An Interview with Ben Lerner
P.S. I love the crazy graphic-photos of writers in this series on Flavorpill.

"I do experience some version of the tension or gap between the virtual and the actual whenever I write: there is always a difference between what I intended to make and what I’ve made. The materials always resist. But this doesn’t have to be described in terms of doom. It can also be described as discovery, that you discover the form and content of the work in the act of writing."

— Ben Lerner (Leaving the Atocha Station, a book you NEED to read) via Flavorwire » The Future of American Fiction: An Interview with Ben Lerner

P.S. I love the crazy graphic-photos of writers in this series on Flavorpill.

"But if a character — like Emily — has tap water to drink and Go-Gurt in the food closet, then the story becomes about the less obvious needs she might have. We always wants something, even if we seem to have everything, and if you can find what it is that’s missing, you may have found a story." —Alison Espach
(via Flavorwire » The Future of American Fiction: An Interview with Alison Espach)

"But if a character — like Emily — has tap water to drink and Go-Gurt in the food closet, then the story becomes about the less obvious needs she might have. We always wants something, even if we seem to have everything, and if you can find what it is that’s missing, you may have found a story."
—Alison Espach

(via Flavorwire » The Future of American Fiction: An Interview with Alison Espach)

A page from Herman Melville’s journal, about meeting Captain Pollard of the Essex. [via] (via Flavorwire » A Peek Inside the Notebooks of Famous Authors, Artists and Visionaries)

A page from Herman Melville’s journal, about meeting Captain Pollard of the Essex. [via] (via Flavorwire » A Peek Inside the Notebooks of Famous Authors, Artists and Visionaries)

"For three years, Maris Kreizman has ran the one stop Tumblr for folks who are equally nerdy about books as they are television. To celebrate, she’s invited a stellar group of people who will probably discuss those two topics while guests sip free drinks sponsored by Tumblr."

Jason Diamond at Slaughterhouse 90210 Third Anniversary Party, Sponsored by Tumblr - Flavorpill New York

Flavorpill says you should be there! Next Tuesday, 7PM and you’ll want to be on time because 1) it’s nice to do and 2) the first 100 drinks are free.

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