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We are a nonprofit bookstore, cafe, and event space in downtown NYC. All proceeds from every show you attend and everything you buy, down to a record and a PBR, go directly to our mission of fighting AIDS and homelessness. 126 Crosby Street, NYC

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Posts tagged lit
Answers at: Classic first lines of novels in emojis: A quiz. 
We got 10 out of 12! Not bad; we innocently did not cotton on to the eggplant symbolism. How’d you do?

Answers at: Classic first lines of novels in emojis: A quiz. 

We got 10 out of 12! Not bad; we innocently did not cotton on to the eggplant symbolism. How’d you do?

New podcast episode! Featuring poems from our CLMP Lit Mag Fair, talk about meat from the July DISH, and some of the conversation from the panel discussion about crime fiction. Check it out on Soundcloud now!

“I mostly write about places that I’ve spent some significant amount of time. I like to know where I’m writing about. Sometimes I attribute it to when I was in college and trying to figure out how to write realist fiction, which did not come naturally to me. I was always getting hung up on how to move the people through the room or how to get them across the town. Where are the traffic lights? How far are these houses from each other? And so I started writing about the town I grew up in, mostly because I just didn’t have to think about where any of those things were and I could accurately draw the map in my head, which made it easier to move away from the off-the-wall shit I was doing and focus on real people—real pretend people, of course, but you know what I mean.”
—Justin Taylor (askforgiveness), who will be here on Tuesday discussing place with Jess Row, in “Real Pretend People”: An Interview with Justin Taylor | The American Reader

I mostly write about places that I’ve spent some significant amount of time. I like to know where I’m writing about. Sometimes I attribute it to when I was in college and trying to figure out how to write realist fiction, which did not come naturally to me. I was always getting hung up on how to move the people through the room or how to get them across the town. Where are the traffic lights? How far are these houses from each other? And so I started writing about the town I grew up in, mostly because I just didn’t have to think about where any of those things were and I could accurately draw the map in my head, which made it easier to move away from the off-the-wall shit I was doing and focus on real people—real pretend people, of course, but you know what I mean.”

—Justin Taylor (askforgiveness), who will be here on Tuesday discussing place with Jess Row, in “Real Pretend People”: An Interview with Justin Taylor | The American Reader

The Jewish Book Council has created this neat literary map of NYC that highlights some of the Jewish writers who’ve written about the city. The map includes Dara Horn, Philip Roth, J. D. Salinger, and many more. (via A Jewish Literary Map of NYC | Electric Literature)

The Jewish Book Council has created this neat literary map of NYC that highlights some of the Jewish writers who’ve written about the city. The map includes Dara Horn, Philip Roth, J. D. Salinger, and many more. (via A Jewish Literary Map of NYC | Electric Literature)

"I don’t want to always write stories about the same kind of disaffected, angsty youngish dude. Everyone assumes he’s a proxy for the author, which is frustrating because he usually isn’t. But it can also be frustrating because sometimes he is, and there are better places to hide than in your own skin. Anyway, I realized that just because a story has someone demographically like me in it, that character shouldn’t automatically get protagonist status. There are, of course, still angsty youngish dudes in this book, but they had to earn their place at the table in a way they didn’t before." —Justin Taylor via Justin Taylor interview: ‘I don’t always want to write about the same disaffected, angsty dude’
Justin is here with Jess Row NEXT week, for Where Are Jess Row and Justin Taylor? on August 26; don’t miss it or his new book, Flings, out today.

"I don’t want to always write stories about the same kind of disaffected, angsty youngish dude. Everyone assumes he’s a proxy for the author, which is frustrating because he usually isn’t. But it can also be frustrating because sometimes he is, and there are better places to hide than in your own skin. Anyway, I realized that just because a story has someone demographically like me in it, that character shouldn’t automatically get protagonist status. There are, of course, still angsty youngish dudes in this book, but they had to earn their place at the table in a way they didn’t before."
—Justin Taylor via Justin Taylor interview: ‘I don’t always want to write about the same disaffected, angsty dude’

Justin is here with Jess Row NEXT week, for Where Are Jess Row and Justin Taylor? on August 26; don’t miss it or his new book, Flings, out today.

A new episode of On Stage at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe is up! It features clips from Integrating Influence: A Poetry Reading and Discussion, Say It to My Face: Confronting the Comments Section, and Hey Ladies! Live. You can listen (and subscribe!) on Soundcloud or iTunes. Enjoy!

In this episode of On Stage at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, Allen Crawford and Rainbow Rowell are together in the same place. Yeah. I know. I’m excited too. Hear Allen explain how he recreated Whitman’s “Song of Myself” through illustration, and listen to Rainbow (my horrible Parisian wifi connection won’t let me tag her! ugh) talk about how johndarnielle's music influenced her writing Eleanor & Park, then read a selection from the novel. If you’re not already, you can subscribe on Soundcloud or iTunes, and make sure to check back for a new episode in two weeks! Enjoy!

Four nights of great events this week:

  • Tonight, the VIDA Roundtable on Literary Biography: Jill Lepore, Rebecca Mead, Salamishah Tillet, Ruth Franklin and moderator Diane Mehta will ask: What is it that compels us to explore the work and personalities of certain women and what are the issues we face when writing about other women?
  • Tomorrow we will be closing at 5:30PM for our SOLD OUT event with David Sedaris and WORD bookstores. Only ticket holders will be admitted to the presentation in the bookstore; however, after the presentation we will open the signing line to anyone interested. We will ask non-ticket holders to line up outside the store and following the presentation will invite all guests to line up by groups for the signing line. Those with a ticket will be admitted to the signing line first; however, anyone who wishes to join the signing line may do so without a pre-purchased book. Full details here.
  • Wednesday DISH, our monthly food writing series, returns with Maureen Petrosky and her new book The Cocktail Club, Alyssa Shelasky and her memoir Apron Anxiety, and Soul Snacks Cookies.
  • And Thursday we welcome back The Minimalists and their new memoir, Everything That Remains. At age 30, Joshua and Ryan left their six-figure corporate careers, got rid of most of their material possessions, and began living more deliberately. Come listen to them speak about their journey into the simple life, followed by a short reading from their new book, a brief Q&A session, and an optional book signing.
  • This weekend, June 7 and 8, is our monthly sale, enjoy 30% off everything in the store!
The Times published a great article today on Larry Kramer, LGBT rights activist and the playwright behind The Normal Heart. You can read the piece here, and check out several signed books from Kramer’s library in our latest Rare Books Catalog here.

The Times published a great article today on Larry Kramer, LGBT rights activist and the playwright behind The Normal Heart. You can read the piece here, and check out several signed books from Kramer’s library in our latest Rare Books Catalog here.

Check out our 32nd podcast episode for clips from Katherine Harmon Courage, Cole Stryker and Michael Malice, and Jen Doll! You can listen on Soundcloud (above) or on iTunes!

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