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We are a nonprofit bookstore, cafe, and event space in downtown NYC. All proceeds from every show you attend and everything you buy, down to a record and a PBR, go directly to our mission of fighting AIDS and homelessness. 126 Crosby Street, NYC

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Posts tagged lit

This week at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe:

Try something new at Monday’s Comedy Notebook, hosted by Rob Paravonian. Established comedians test their new material on you, the audience. Mwahaha.

We’re exploring the great Midwest and its rich lit culture with curbsidesplendor and vol1brooklyn at In the Middle of Everything. ​Readings by Jason Diamond, Dmitry Samarov, Megan Stielstra, Erika Wurth, and D.Foy! 

Your worst e-mail nightmares will come true (for other people) at Shit Rough E-mails with Paul Laudiero and Friends. We promise this event will be highly therapeutic.

Storytellers will throw down Thursday’s The Moth StorySLAM. The topic? Rivalry. OoooOOOOoooh.

We’re hosting a pair of book club meetings this weekend! Fans of Billy Pilgrim assemble for Saturday’s Kurt Vonnegut Book Club. The selection is Slaughterhouse-Five. On Sunday Face-to-Face, our book club for readers aged 8-12, will meet to discuss Jerry Spinelli’s Maniac Magee

One more note: We’re holding a second monthly sale day! The bookstore was unexpectedly closed for much of last Saturday, but we still want to offer you blazing hot deals on books, music, and MORE. Visit us on Saturday, September 13, for Monthly Sale: Pt 2

McBride’s widely lauded novel is full of fragmented, floating sentences that sometimes feel like only gestures at sentences, like gestures at the things under thoughts, that real, pre-language stuff. It’s hard going at first, but once you let the language wash over you and form a rhythm, the book blossoms into a gorgeous, brutal stream of word and thought. (via Experimental Novels Everyone Should Read – Flavorwire)

A great description of what it’s like to read this amazing book.

McBride’s widely lauded novel is full of fragmented, floating sentences that sometimes feel like only gestures at sentences, like gestures at the things under thoughts, that real, pre-language stuff. It’s hard going at first, but once you let the language wash over you and form a rhythm, the book blossoms into a gorgeous, brutal stream of word and thought. (via Experimental Novels Everyone Should Read – Flavorwire)

A great description of what it’s like to read this amazing book.

We’re celebrating this day in literary history in the window! Stop by Crosby Street for fun facts like today, September 9, 1910, Alice B. Toklas moved in with Gertrude Stein.

This week at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe:

Arrive early for Tuesday evening’s The Moth StorySLAM, this time themed around do-overs, and you won’t need one yourself.

Lifeguard’s on duty for Ocean of Poets, featuring poets Betsy Andrews, Niki Koulouris, and Jen Coleman. The mystery, the majesty: the sea! This one’s free, just as a natural wonder should be.

Author Ed Lin and Soho Press Associate Publisher Juliet Grames will visit the bookstore for our International Crime Book Group Saturday. This month’s meeting takes us to Taipei City, Taiwan, for suspense, adventure, and betel nuts.

Answers at: Classic first lines of novels in emojis: A quiz. 
We got 10 out of 12! Not bad; we innocently did not cotton on to the eggplant symbolism. How’d you do?

Answers at: Classic first lines of novels in emojis: A quiz. 

We got 10 out of 12! Not bad; we innocently did not cotton on to the eggplant symbolism. How’d you do?

New podcast episode! Featuring poems from our CLMP Lit Mag Fair, talk about meat from the July DISH, and some of the conversation from the panel discussion about crime fiction. Check it out on Soundcloud now!

“I mostly write about places that I’ve spent some significant amount of time. I like to know where I’m writing about. Sometimes I attribute it to when I was in college and trying to figure out how to write realist fiction, which did not come naturally to me. I was always getting hung up on how to move the people through the room or how to get them across the town. Where are the traffic lights? How far are these houses from each other? And so I started writing about the town I grew up in, mostly because I just didn’t have to think about where any of those things were and I could accurately draw the map in my head, which made it easier to move away from the off-the-wall shit I was doing and focus on real people—real pretend people, of course, but you know what I mean.”
—Justin Taylor (askforgiveness), who will be here on Tuesday discussing place with Jess Row, in “Real Pretend People”: An Interview with Justin Taylor | The American Reader

I mostly write about places that I’ve spent some significant amount of time. I like to know where I’m writing about. Sometimes I attribute it to when I was in college and trying to figure out how to write realist fiction, which did not come naturally to me. I was always getting hung up on how to move the people through the room or how to get them across the town. Where are the traffic lights? How far are these houses from each other? And so I started writing about the town I grew up in, mostly because I just didn’t have to think about where any of those things were and I could accurately draw the map in my head, which made it easier to move away from the off-the-wall shit I was doing and focus on real people—real pretend people, of course, but you know what I mean.”

—Justin Taylor (askforgiveness), who will be here on Tuesday discussing place with Jess Row, in “Real Pretend People”: An Interview with Justin Taylor | The American Reader

The Jewish Book Council has created this neat literary map of NYC that highlights some of the Jewish writers who’ve written about the city. The map includes Dara Horn, Philip Roth, J. D. Salinger, and many more. (via A Jewish Literary Map of NYC | Electric Literature)

The Jewish Book Council has created this neat literary map of NYC that highlights some of the Jewish writers who’ve written about the city. The map includes Dara Horn, Philip Roth, J. D. Salinger, and many more. (via A Jewish Literary Map of NYC | Electric Literature)

"I don’t want to always write stories about the same kind of disaffected, angsty youngish dude. Everyone assumes he’s a proxy for the author, which is frustrating because he usually isn’t. But it can also be frustrating because sometimes he is, and there are better places to hide than in your own skin. Anyway, I realized that just because a story has someone demographically like me in it, that character shouldn’t automatically get protagonist status. There are, of course, still angsty youngish dudes in this book, but they had to earn their place at the table in a way they didn’t before." —Justin Taylor via Justin Taylor interview: ‘I don’t always want to write about the same disaffected, angsty dude’
Justin is here with Jess Row NEXT week, for Where Are Jess Row and Justin Taylor? on August 26; don’t miss it or his new book, Flings, out today.

"I don’t want to always write stories about the same kind of disaffected, angsty youngish dude. Everyone assumes he’s a proxy for the author, which is frustrating because he usually isn’t. But it can also be frustrating because sometimes he is, and there are better places to hide than in your own skin. Anyway, I realized that just because a story has someone demographically like me in it, that character shouldn’t automatically get protagonist status. There are, of course, still angsty youngish dudes in this book, but they had to earn their place at the table in a way they didn’t before."
—Justin Taylor via Justin Taylor interview: ‘I don’t always want to write about the same disaffected, angsty dude’

Justin is here with Jess Row NEXT week, for Where Are Jess Row and Justin Taylor? on August 26; don’t miss it or his new book, Flings, out today.

A new episode of On Stage at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe is up! It features clips from Integrating Influence: A Poetry Reading and Discussion, Say It to My Face: Confronting the Comments Section, and Hey Ladies! Live. You can listen (and subscribe!) on Soundcloud or iTunes. Enjoy!

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